Tag Archives: arctic tundra

10 to 12 May 2015 – leaving Norway, glimpse of Finland, hello Sweden

That was a good night’s sleep, lovely and warm in my cabin. I think the campsite lady believes I’m a bit mad for coming here now rather than in summer, however despite the cold and rain I was smiling when I arrived yesterday, and was still smiling in the morning, which she seemed impressed by. At least I don’t get plagued by mosquitos and midges at this time of year.

My cosy cabin for the night

My cosy cabin for the night

I was up in good time to tackle the 130km to Kautokeino, my longest ride of the tour yet. I was slightly nervous due to the hills, continuing headwind, and chilly weather. This part of Scandinavia can be pretty unforgiving if you’re not prepared for it. Only one thing for it really, thumbs up and off we go; I’ve worked out how to use the timer on my camera, but still need to work on the angles!

Thumbs up and off I pedal

Thumbs up and off I pedal

Anyway, off I pedalled in the drizzle, keen to be on my way to the Artic Mobil campsite at the other end of the ride, as well as the Remo supermarket in the town, or village, or whatever it turned out to be. The road wound through pine forested hills next to a big river; the Karasjokka followed by the Jiesjokka I think.

Following the river through pine forested valley

Following the river through pine forested valley

I started passing quite a few piles of logs by the roadside, awaiting pick up to one sawmill or another. Logging must be a key industry here, especially with all the log built houses, however none of the hills look too denuded of trees so seems to be well managed.

Log piles by the roadside

Log piles by the roadside

The rain stopped after a couple of hours, bonus, and fueled by bread, salami and banana from breakfast I made good time over the hills, crossing a fast flowing and very cold looking river as the sun came out.

Very cold looking river - fancy a dip anyone?

Very cold looking river – fancy a dip anyone?

Bridge crossing - more Arctic Tundra on the menu

Bridge crossing – more Arctic Tundra on the menu

I soon climbed out of the pine forests and back into Arctic tundra, passing the now familiar scenes of frozen lakes and scrubby silver birch. I was pretty happy to see a sign saying only another 70km to Kautokeino.

70km to Kautokeino

70km to Kautokeino

Taking that photo did earn me a honk from a passing car, one of the few I’d seen in the last hour that snuck up on me. Undeterred I cycled on, stopping to top up energy levels next to…another frozen lake.

Lobster rationing sweets; 1 for me, 2 for him

Lobster rationing sweets; 1 for me, 2 for him

Frozen lake panorama - lot of them about

Frozen lake panorama – lot of them about

It was another double thumbs up moment, still haven’t got the angle right.

Double thumbs up under blue skies

Double thumbs up under blue skies

The E92 eventually turned into the E93, amongst a sudden convergence of speeding lorries which was slightly alarming. The E92 had been pretty quiet, however E93 definitely saw an increase in traffic levels with HGVs going from North to South and vice-versa. I didn’t see any moose, despite there being warming signs about them, but I did spot some more reindeer, which I duly herded off the road.

Doing a bit of reindeer herding - so like the sheep in Scotland

Doing a bit of reindeer herding – so like the sheep in Scotland

The whole landscape is criss-crossed with snow mobile tracks, which are especially visible on the frozen lakes. I saw one snow mobile speeding across a lake which looked to be thawing rather rapidly; rather them than me.

Other than the reindeer there was plenty of bird life to listen to, as well as catch glimpses of as I pedalled along. At one point I think I saw an owl, it was definitely owl shaped; I guess they have the hunt when it’s light here. I also saw an eagle, not sure what sort, as well as more geese and numerous smaller birds, some quite colourful but all to quick to catch on film.

The road continued on like this.

The road is long, with quite a few winding turns

The road is long, with quite a few winding turns

And in a similar fashion like this.

Okay, so less of the winding turns at this point

Okay, so less of the winding turns at this point

I may have been getting a bit blaze about the stunning landscape at this stage, however I’d seen a lot of the same for a while now and was quite looking forward to a town. I’d passed a few small villages nestled on hillsides, but nothing of any significant size. It makes me wonder what people do to survive/earn a living up here; there must be forestry, maybe mining, and tourism.

After a lot of ups and downs I eventually made Kautokeino after 9 hours and 15 minutes in the saddle, covering 129km. I was tired by the time I reached the Arctic Mobil campsite due to all the hills, as well as the headwind, however the campsite owner, a jovial Norwegian lady with only limited English, gave me the use of the Sami tipi for the night which buoyed my spirits, and cheap at 100 NOK. One downside; the shower, which cost 10 NOK, was cold, not what you want after a hard day’s riding.

Arctic Mobil campsite in Kautokeino - Sami tipi for the night

Arctic Mobil campsite in Kautokeino – Sami tipi for the night

Inside the tipi - pretty snug, and room for Smaug too

Inside the tipi – pretty snug, and room for Smaug too

Feeling rather tired I decamped to the campsite kitchen to cook up some noodles and drink peppermint tea whilst I planned the next few days. Sometimes I really miss coffee but don’t drink it anymore due to migraines, somehow peppermint tea just doesn’t quite do it. I should have brought some whisky, that would help, haven’t had a drink since arriving in Scandinavia; a bit odd but not missing it at the moment. After a few hours I retired for the night, but not before putting on my thermals and a few layers as the temperature was dropping to freezing, as evidenced by the snow getting more crunchy. The tipi, whilst comfy, was a little drafty, it having a hole for the smoke to go out of; as recompense it did have a divan type thing to sleep on.

I slept extremely well that night, waking up a bit late (08:15) but refreshed, and to sunshine, ready for the day ahead. In the back of my mind I was considering whether I could pedal out of Norway, all the way through Finland, and into Sweden in 1 day. I didn’t think I could make it, and there looked to be campsite and wild camping options along the way, but I decided to keep an open mind; 3 countries in 1 day would be an achievement, and I like setting myself challenges to liven things up.

A new day awaits, the sun shines

A new day awaits, the sun shines

After breakfast and more peppermint tea I pedalled to the supermarket for supplies, bidding the jolly landlady goodbye with a wave. I splurged out in chocolate and expensive salami, needing to use up some NOK.

Remo supermarket seem to be the staple in Norway

Remo supermarket seem to be the staple in Norway

I found a pastry, it was pretty nice, and gave me a good boost for the ride ahead.

Second breakfast in Kautokeino

Second breakfast in Kautokeino

I rode down the E93 to the border with Finland, keeping an eye out for moose again.

Beware the moose

Beware the moose

I didn’t see any, but passed lots more tundra and frozen lakes.

I pedalled through the border via the ‘Nothing to declare’ channel, passing some lorries stopped at customs that must have been transporting fish; very smelly. Goodbye Norway, hello Finland.

So, on into Finland, my 3rd country of the tour, and my first impressions were that it wasn’t a lot different to Norway; more reindeer for example.

Finnish reindeer

Finnish reindeer

The road through Lapland took me down to Enontekio where I thought I might find a campsite, even if it was a bit soon to stop; I didn’t, so I carried on toward Palojoensuu. Some of the place names are quite convoluted so apologies for any typos.

Pedalling through Finland

Pedalling through Finland

I rode through part of a national park, a sign telling me to watch out for all sorts of wildlife including Brown Bears, Pine Martens, Otters and Lynx; I didn’t see any of these but again birds were in abundance; Snow Buntings, Ptarmigan (heard not seen), Grouse, Capercaillie and birds of prey.

I passed through fells, forest and mires, keeping to the road of course. I thought this might be a good place to camp, until a lorry turned up and looked intent on staying for a while, with the engine running.

Nice lakeside stop, could've worked for wild camp aside from lorry

Nice lakeside stop, could’ve worked for wild camp aside from lorry

There were lots of frozen lakes again, but there seemed to be more thawing going on in Finland.

More thawing going on in Finland

More thawing going on in Finland

Pedalling through pines and Silver Birch the road was a lot flatter and made for easier riding than the last few days. I could hear the sounds of running water everywhere, mixed with birdsong, with the occasional reindeer or group thereof startling as I rode by. It was as if the land was waking up from being asleep all winter.

Island in the river, Finland

Island in the river, Finland

There was so much running water from all the snow melt, and all of it very brown, leaving everywhere very damp and not very suitable for stopping to camp. I made it to Palojoensuu and guess what, couldn’t find a campsite despite there being one marked on the map; maybe it just hadn’t opened for the season yet. I cycled on keeping my eyes peeled for a suitable spot out of sight of the road, but everywhere was either snowbound, or in one instance had a large ant’s nest inconveniently positioned; there are quite a lot of large ant’s nests in Scandinavia, all waking up, reckon it’s one mega colony.

Possible wild camp option ruled out due to snow and ants

Possible wild camp option ruled out due to snow and ants

After a bit of a climb I finally made Kaaresuvanto about 21:30, then crossed over the bridge and into Sweden and Karesuando. I’d done it, 3 countries in 1 day!

There was no activity on the border, and I pedalled straight through following the signs to a campsite, which turned out to be closed, or completely absent of anybody anyway. Without realising it I’d gained an hour somewhere along the line, but after 146 km I was too tired to pedal any further, so opted to pitch my tent anyway and pay if anyone turned up, which they didn’t, so a free night’s stealth camping for me, wahey!

Tent pitched, Hilleberg Akto doing well

Tent pitched, Hilleberg Akto doing well

Deserted campsite in Karaesuando

Deserted campsite in Karesuando

After several rounds of cheese and salami sandwiches I turned in for the night, listening to the sounds of birds singing, or in some cases just squawking. Pretty awesome day I thought, as I drifted off to sleep.

Wake up call in Karesuando

Wake up call in Karesuando

No sooner had I fallen asleep than I heard my alarm go off, at 06.00; I’d slept pretty well again. To be honest I think it was more the bird song that woke me up; so many birds singing, and new calls I haven’t heard before. Over breakfast I watched a hawk getting mobbed by two very persistent Magpies, who eventually forced it to land in a tree.

My phone said it was 06.00, however I think it might have actually been 05.00, as the time kept changing as I crossed the border and further into Sweden, it was a bit confusing but didn’t really matter.

No-one had turned up overnight, and there was no number to phone, so I packed and pedalled off from my stealth camp at about 07.00, or could have been 06.00. Unfortunately there was nowhere to refill my water bottles but I still had one and half left.

Good morning - still a bit early really

Good morning – still a bit early really

I rode through the village of Karesuando, which still looked mostly asleep aside from one other cyclist pedalling the other way, who glanced at me rather confusedly; I gave them a wave anyway.

Leaving Karesuando Camping

Leaving Karesuando Camping

The road took me through pine forested countryside, with little in the way of hills or any kind of wind, however it was quite cold and overcast, despite the sunshine earlier; at least the rain held off.

I pedalled past the village of Narva, out on an island.

Narva

Narva

The scenery didn’t really vary very much, and there wasn’t much in the way of traffic. A few cars gave me a wave, as did a few lorries (mostly Post Nord Logistics), and the one police car I’ve seen all tour flashed their lights at me and gave me a thumbs up, all nice and encouraging; although I hoped they weren’t just trying to warn me of an impending hurricane or snow storm.

Road like this for quite a long time

Road like this for quite a long time

I could go 30 minutes to an hour without seeing another vehicle, certainly no other cyclists, lots of thinking time. Lobster had to give me a motivational talk at one point.

Motivational talk from Lobster

Motivational talk from Lobster

You can start wondering what on earth you think you’re doing, riding all the way out here, on your own, in these conditions? Why not do what ‘normal’ people do and take a trip to New York, or the Maldives? Why set yourself challenges like this?

I’m not sure I completely know the answer to these questions, however I know it’s to do at least partly with continuing to try to discover myself, and to give myself time to mull things over and perhaps decide on a future direction. I know I enjoy setting myself a challenge and seeing just what my limits are. I’m also a strong believer that it’s important to get out of your comfort zone from time to time, in order to grow as a person and experience the joy of new things, and grow in confidence. Then there’s just the joy of travelling, seeing new places and meeting new people. I could prattle on for ages about this, however in summary I’d recommend everyone, should the opportunity arise, take some time out and challenge yourself once in a while; see what happens.

I arrived in Vitangi, my destination for the day, at about 12.30, a bit earlier than expected due to the time zone change thing. I had a quick look around, and was hailed by a lady who’d seen me cycle out of Karesuando earlier; she congratulated me on a quick ride – 110km all in about 6 hours.

Vitangi Church

Vitangi Church

The town hosts a population of about 800 people, according to a sign, and lies to the South of the lake, the campsite being on the North side. You have to cross a bridge to reach it. The ice on the lake has nearly all melted, in contrast to most of the lakes I’ve passed to date.

Ice on lake nearly all melted - you might be able to see some swans standing on it

Ice on lake nearly all melted – you might be able to see some swans standing on it

Lakeside 1

Lakeside 1

The grassy nodules look like they might be troll heads, think they're formed by old tree stumps

The grassy nodules look like they might be troll heads, think they’re formed by old tree stumps

After pedalling about a bit I cycled back over the bridge to the campsite, which was as deserted as the one from last night. It did however have open toilets, shower, and a kitchen room, with power and running water. I tried calling the number at reception but there was no answer, so I pitched up anyway, and sat out enjoying the sun which had come out in force, warming things up nicely, and drying a few clothes I washed through.

Campsite with lakeside view

Campsite with lakeside view

Noodles were on the menu again, with cheese and Tabasco, hasn’t got boring yet.

Noodles, cheese, Tabasco and peppermint tea

Noodles, cheese, Tabasco and peppermint tea

I thought I saw a furry rodent face scuttle pass at one point, through the grass, but might have imagined it. There was certainly a lot of bird life about again, and I nodded off for a while listening to them all.

Lobster ensuring I record the day's events accurately

Lobster ensuring I record the day’s events accurately

Despite enjoying the solitude I was quite looking forward to getting to more populated areas again, where I might meet a few more people. It’s great being out in the ‘wilderness’ and I love the challenges it brings, however it can get a bit samey.

VItangi campsite double thumbs up

VItangi campsite double thumbs up

As if on cue a camper van turned up with a couple from Switzerland, and one of them was a cycle tourer being driven up to Nordkapp by his wife, Astrid, to start his own tour! Fredy, 65 and just retired, intends to cycle back down to Switzerland and then, if all goes according to plan, on to South Africa. He’s taking a slightly different route to me, via Russia and Estonia, and said it was a bit of nightmare securing the Russian visa.

Freddy, off to start his own tour

Freddy, off to start his own tour

What’s more, he’s doing it with his dog Dimitri, in a trailer! And Dimitri isn’t exactly small.

Dimitri snuffling about

Dimitri snuffling about

This is the second person I’ve met this year cycle touring with their dog. The first was Maggie Scorer, who is currently cycling around the coast of Britain, a tour that I completed in 2013, with her Dog Oscar – http://dogontour.co.uk . Oscar isn’t very small either, but looks like he’s loving it from the pictures.

It was great chatting with Fredy for the evening, hearing about his plans and comparing notes. He felt like he had to do something now he’s retired, and would regret it if he didn’t, and now he’s doing it, brilliant. His website is here: http://www.sasbybike.ch (there might be an English version coming soon). He’s a rotary club member, which I assume is the same organisation as in the UK, and is raising money for charity – school in Africa. Fredy also has a passion for birds and brought me up-to-speed on the various species I was likely to see, or that I’d already seen.

VItangi, sun through the trees

VItangi, sun through the trees

I wish I could speak more foreign languages. Everyone I’ve met so far has at least adequate English, whereas I only have adequate French as well as English, and a smattering of words in other languages. Hopefully I’ll pick up some more on this tour.

Needless to say it was great to meet a fellow tourer, my first since reaching mainland Europe, and I hope to bump into Fredy and Dimitri on the road somewhere in the future; he has some great plans, and Astrid is very supportive in driving him all the way up here. The chance meeting gave me the boost I needed, and I retired to my tent after a lovely evening, falling asleep quickly after a last cup of peppermint tea.

Tune in next time to hear about my encounter with a varmint – remember that furry rodent face I thought I saw…

Does anyone want to see my ride statistics/map? I can post links to them on the Garmin website if so, I just keep forgetting.

Also, I’m in Gallivare now, and still 100km in the Arctic Circle, should make it out tomorrow. Need to tot up my total km too.

08 and 09 May – the Arctic Tundra

I forgot to include a few pics from Nordkapp on my last post, of the round carvings at the cape designed by children from several nationalities who gathered there to have them erected in the name of peace. They’re quite striking, although I did get slightly soggy feet getting to them.

Back to more current affairs. I slept solidly for about 10 hours in Olderfjord, a pretty solid rest after the hard cycle down from Honningsvag, and awoke to a brilliant view and sunny day.

Oldefjord - nice view to wake up to

Oldefjord – nice view to wake up to

After breakfast I packed up, paid up, and pedalled off, but not before pausing to gaze across the Norwegian ‘Ocean’, a beautiful vista. Today would be the last day I rode alongside it, as I head further South and inland towards Finland and Sweden.

Packed and ready to pedal to Lakselv

Packed and ready to pedal to Lakselv

Here’s another shot from the same place as Lobster couldn’t decide on the angle.

Packed and ready to pedal to Lakselv 2

Packed and ready to pedal to Lakselv 2

I intended to stop in Lakselv for the night, some 65 km away, and the day looked promising with the sun shining and the temperature going up. Unfortunately the wind that made yesterday difficult was back today, albeit not as strongly which came as a relief.

Coastline alongside E09

Coastline alongside E09

Ride down from Olderfjord pretty spectacular

Ride down from Olderfjord pretty spectacular

The ride down the E09 was pretty spectacular, with more trees gradually appearing, a few reindeer herds, and at one point a couple of moose in a paddock; I don’t think they were wild but could be wrong.

The long and winding E09

The long and winding E09

Handlebar view - not much room for anything else

Handlebar view – not much room for anything else

Two moose regarding me with suspicion

Two moose regarding me with suspicion

As well as the moose, more cars (not just Volvos!) were starting to appear, and more frequent signs of human habitation, not quite towns yet but getting there. I even passed a couple of the people on bicycles, not tourers but they gave a friendly wave which always makes you smile and gives a boost.

Nature reserve 1

Nature reserve 1

The Arctic tundra was still very much in evidence, however I did pass through a nature reserve where the river forms a delta into the sea, where much bird life was in evidence; mostly wildfowl but also a few buzzards soaring about.

Lakselv delta nature reserve

Lakselv delta nature reserve

Have I mentioned how handy it is to have a bike stand on this tour? I wouldn’t leave home without one now, so much easier!

How handy is a bike stand?!

How handy is a bike stand?!

The terrain was mostly gently undulating, with the occasional bigger hill. All easily manageable; my legs must be getting stronger. I passed a pen full of Huskies basking in the sunshine, they gathered to have a look at me but didn’t enter into a barking fit which was a pleasant change as far as dogs are concerned. Despite the headwind I made good time to Lakselv, amazingly being spotted by my stalkers from home on the town webcam as I rode in.

I resupplied at the Remo supermarket in Lakselv, and then decided to carry on to a campsite a bit further on, my legs still feeling pretty fresh. I had a small escort of kids on bikes as I left the town; I don’t think they’d seen a bike with so much luggage on before.

The next campsite was only 10km down the road, but it proved to be closed which was a little frustrating after diverting up a track for a few kilometres to find it. Still, it was a nice off road detour, and I passed a several butterflies flitting about, struggling against the wind slightly, as well as emerging wildflowers; it must be springtime! It definitely felt warmer, perhaps around 11 degrees centigrade, with a few cold patches when the sun went in.

Still feeling fit I decided not to go back to Lakselv, but to pedal on to Skoganvarre where the ACSI app reliably informed me there was definitely an open campsite. I rode on for another 20 kilometres, passing through a restricted army zone where no photos are allowed; a shame as some wonderful frozen lakes and pine forested mountains. I nodded to the bored guard on gate duty as I passed a barracks, he nodded back, smiling, clearly amused at the stupid cyclist slogging through the hills at this time of year.

I arrived at the campsite at about 17.30, having covered 95km which I’m pretty pleased with after 97km the day before. Thankfully the campsite was indeed open, and I was able to pitch my tent close to another frozen lake where people go fishing on the ice in winter.

Skoganvarre campsite - frozen lake thawing

Skoganvarre campsite – frozen lake thawing

The ice is thawing now, bringing the ice fishing season to an end, which means this campsite will close in a few days and not open again until June for the next batch of holiday makers; guess I got lucky. I chatted to a couple if Finns who have been coming here for years; apparently the fishing hasn’t been good this year, I hope it’s not a case of over-fishing like so many other areas of the world. It was great to talk to them and I’m constantly impressed at how good nearly everyone’s English is up here, can’t say the same of my Norwegian, although I have mastered ‘Takk’, just about.

Tent set up in Skoganvarre

Tent set up in Skoganvarre

The campsite was a little more expensive at 150 NOK for the night, but I did have use of a campsite kitchen, as well as a lovely hot shower which was most welcome. I spent the evening eating, not unusual, as well as planning the next few days ride and updating my blog. Oh, and I remembered to check the UK general election results; a conservative majority which came as a bit of a surprise, and a shame to see such a big Lib Dem collapse, perhaps not such a surprise though. I really haven’t missed all the social media furore and indignation.

Thanks to everyone following my tour so far, and for the comments whether they be on twitter, Facebook or here, helps keep me motivated; although that’s not too tricky given the scenery I’m cycling through.

I didn’t get such a good a night’s sleep in Skoganvarre, due to some of the other residents packing up and leaving in the very early hours of the morning, and not being at all quiet about it. Tent walls aren’t very sound proof, especially versus slamming doors and shouting. Anyway, I awoke to the sound of rain, and was somewhat reluctant to get up, so had breakfast in bed instead; bread, salami and banana, what a luxury!

Cloudy and raining in Skoganvarre

Cloudy and raining in Skoganvarre

Using a porch to shelter from the rain I packed up, and was soon on my way, waving goodbye to the campsite owner and hacking a couple of Ingress portals in range of the Wifi signal as I pedalled out; if you’re confused as to what Ingress is look it up, it’s a fun game to play, especially when you’re travelling, but data hungry so I’m not playing it much out here.

Packing up in a porch

Packing up in a porch

It was only a 50km ride to Karasjok, up an initial gradual 1000 foot climb to a plateau, then across and down to the municipal village. I opted for the yellow lenses in my glasses today, they make everything look happy.

Yellow lenses make things look happy

Yellow lenses make things look happy

Rainy day on the road

Rainy day on the road

Crossing the river Lakselv

Crossing the river Lakselv

Whilst the cycling was relatively easy, especially without the headwind of the last few days, it was pretty cold and wet. The scenery was impressive; Arctic tundra consisting of silver birch scrub pines, and more frozen lakes. I expect it looks starkly different and beautiful in the summer, but with a lot more insects of a biting nature.

My passage along the road was accompanied by the sound of cawing crows, honking geese, and other tweeting birds all waking up for the spring. I think I might have seen a Waxwing, but it was only flitting by and I not sure if they all migrate or not; I suspect all the geese I’ve seen and been honked at by are migratory.

Latterly I started to hear the sounds of bangs in the distance. I think there are a lot of hunters in Norway, as was evidenced by the two people dressed in snow camo heading off into the tundra dragging sleds behind them, complete with rifles; I wonder what they were hunting? Probably why there aren’t many bears or wolves left.

Road side map with bullet/shotgun pellet holes, a little concerning

Road side map with bullet/shotgun pellet holes, a little concerning

I eventually passed the source of the bangs – Karasjok shooting club by the looks of it.

What must be the Karasjok shooting club

What must be the Karasjok shooting club

The descent down into Karasjok was pretty fast and thus freezing. You get cold pretty quickly when you’re not pedalling and it’s damp, however it’s nice to get some speed up now and again. Karasjok has a cool coast of arms, 3 fires on a shield, representing the 3 ethnicities that live here; Sami, Norwegian and Kvens.

Coat of arms of Karasjok kommune

The Kvens are Finnish and Swedish peasants/fishermen who migrated to Northern Norway in the 18th and 19th centuries, and of whom I had no prior knowledge. I’d heard of the Sami, and Karasjok is where their parliament is based.

The Sami (Laplanders) are the indigenous people of Northern Europe, the Arctic  bits, and are found in Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola peninsula of Russia. They’re traditionally fishermen and sheep herders, as well as fur trappers, and of course nomadic reindeer herders; the Sami are the only people allowed to herd reindeer here. I’ve passed several touristy Sami spots so far, and seen a few in their cultural dress of red coats and dual pointed black hats, but haven’t had chance to get any photos yet; somehow seems a but crass.

I also spotted this sign; Norwegian zebra crossing signs are much cooler than UK ones.

Look cool whilst using this crossing

Look cool whilst using this crossing

I found the campsite and decided to opt for a cabin, which whilst a luxury at 500 NOK would be warm, allow me to dry my stuff, and would set me up for the long ride tomorrow; about 130km to the next campsite!

The cabin was very cosy with a nice view.

Cosy cabin in Karasjok

Cosy cabin in Karasjok

Room with a view

Room with a view

I feasted on noodles and cheese, followed later on by an expedition pack of minced beef hot-pot I’ve been lugging around with me for about 2 years, and which I need to use before it allegedly expires.

Finishing the evening watching some Bear Grylls ‘The Island’, using a VPN link to access 4 on demand from the Europe, very handy. I don’t think I’ll get many tips on how to survive the Arctic tundra from the TV show, entertaining though it is.

Early night now before tomorrow’s attempt at 130km (80 miles), I hope it’s not raining.